Cal Poly Pomona
Cal Poly Pomona
Sepehr Eskandari, Ph.D. - CV
Ion-Coupled Cotransport
CURRICULUM VITAE

Sepehr Eskandari, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair
Biological Sciences Department
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
3801 West Temple Avenue
Pomona, California 91768-4032
Tel.: (909) 869-4182
Fax: (909) 869-4078
E-mail: seskandari@csupomona.edu
Web: www.csupomona.edu/~seskandari/


Education
Professional Experience
Membership in Professional Organizations and Honorary Societies
Honors and Awards
Research Focus and Expertise
Teaching Expertise
Research Grants
Teaching Grants
Grants Related to the Advancement of Department, College, and University
Publications
Invited Presentations
Professional Service

Complete CV in pdf format [pdf]

Education Return to top of page
B.S. Chemistry
1993
Chemistry Department
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
  
M.S. Biology (Emphasis: Integrative Physiology)
1995
Biological Sciences Department
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Mentor: Daniel F. Stiffler, Ph.D.
  
Ph.D. Physiology
1999
Department of Physiology
School of Medicine
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
Mentor: Ernest M. Wright, D.Sc.
  
Post-Doctoral Training 1999-2000
Departments of Physiology and Neurobiology
School of Medicine
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
Mentors: Guido A. Zampighi, Ph.D. and Ernest M. Wright, D.Sc.



Professional Experience Return to top of page
2000 - 2005 Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences Department
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Pomona, CA 91768-4032
  
2005 - 2010 Associate Professor
Biological Sciences Department
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Pomona, CA 91768-4032
  
2010 - Present Professor
Biological Sciences Department
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Pomona, CA 91768-4032
  
2010/2011 Professor and Associate Chair
Biological Sciences Department
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Pomona, CA 91768-4032
  
07/2011 - 12/2011 Professor and Interim Chair
Biological Sciences Department
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Pomona, CA 91768-4032
  
2012 - Present Professor and Chair
Biological Sciences Department
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Pomona, CA 91768-4032



Membership in Professional Organizations and Honorary Societies Return to top of page
  1. American Association for the Advancement of Science (1996)
  2. American Physiological Society (1995)
  3. American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2003)
  4. Biophysical Society (1995)
  5. Society for Neuroscience (1995)
  6. West Coast Salt and Water Club (1996)
  7. Golden Key National Honor Society (1992)



Honors and Awards Return to top of page
  1. Cal Poly Scholar Athlete of the Year, 1988/89
  2. Vernon Gregory Memorial Scholarship Award, Cal Poly Pomona, 1993/94
  3. Biological Sciences Graduate Student Research Award, Cal Poly Pomona, 1994/95
  4. American Physiological Society Procter & Gamble Professional Opportunity Award, 1998
  5. John Field Award, Department of Physiology, UCLA School of Medicine, 1998
  6. Travel Grant; 1999 International Gap Junction Conference, Gwatt, Switzerland
  7. Ahmanson Foundation Cellular Neurobiology Post-Doctoral Training Grant, Brain Research Institute, UCLA, 1999/2000
  8. College of Science Distinguished Teaching Award, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, 2005
  9. Biotechnology Faculty Research Award, California State University Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology (CSUPERB), 2011



Research Focus and Expertise Return to top of page
Research in this laboratory focuses on the brain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters. These molecules are involved in the regulation of inhibitory neuronal signaling in the brain and, in addition, are the targets of several important experimental and clinical drugs. Because GABA is the most abundant inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, the GABA transporters are implicated in the treatment of epileptic seizures, and in the control of the devastating consequences of stroke. Our goal is to elucidate a comprehensive understanding of GABA transporter structure and function. In addition, we are interested in the nature of drug interaction with the GABA transporters. Our functional experiments examine wild-type, chimeric, and mutant transporters and are designed with the goal of gaining a deeper understanding of the mechanism of transport cycle. The pharmacological experiments focus on identifying the minimum substrate structural features needed for recognition and translocation by the transporter. The long-term goal of the pharmacological studies is to identify/develop compounds that selectively target various isoforms of the GABA transporters found in different brain regions. Such research will pave the way for localized pharmacological treatment of epileptic seizures, stroke, and other pathophysiological conditions in which neurons enter hyper-excited states. Electrophysiological (two-electrode voltage clamp, patch clamp, ion-selective electrodes), molecular and cell biological (site-directed mutagenesis, western blots, etc.), imaging (light and fluorescence microscopy, thin section and freeze-fracture electron microscopy), as well as isotope methods are used to achieve these goals.



Teaching Expertise Return to top of page
  1. Transport across Cell Membranes
  2. Electrophysiological Methods
  3. Freeze-Fracture Electron Microscopy
  4. Molecular and Cellular Physiology
  5. Animal Physiology
  6. Human Physiology
  7. Radiation Biology
  8. Biophysics
  9. Introductory Biology



Research Grants Return to top of page
  1. Molecular physiology of γ-aminobutyric acid transporters. Principal Investigator. ($444,791 in direct and indirect costs). National Institutes of Health (S06 GM-53933). 2001–2004.
  2. The effect of anti-epileptic drugs on the brain γ-aminobutyric acid transporters. ($5,000). Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activities Grant. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. 2001.
  3. The effect of anti-epileptic drugs on the brain γ-aminobutyric acid transporters ($750). Faculty Professional Development Mini-Grant. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. 2001.
  4. Equipment supplement to S06 GM-53933. Co-Principal Investigator. ($485,610). National Institutes of Health. 2002.
  5. Molecular physiology of γ-aminobutyric acid transporters. Principal Investigator. ($640,727 in direct and indirect costs). National Institutes of Health (S06 GM-53933). 2004–2008.
  6. Molecular physiology of γ-aminobutyric acid transporters. Principal Investigator. ($1,278,000 in direct and indirect costs). National Institutes of Health; National Institute of General Medical Sciences (SC1GM086344). 2009–2012.
  7. Equipment supplement to SC1GM086344. Principal Investigator. ($39,282). National Institutes of Health (3SC1GM086344-01S1 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences). 2009–2010.
  8. Components of inhibitory signal transmission in bovine sperm. Principal Investigator. ($50,000). California State University Agricultural Research Institute. 2011-2012.
  9. Role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters in bovine sperm physiology. Principal Investigator. ($72,900). California State University Agricultural Research Initiative. 2013-2014.



Teaching Grants Return to top of page
  1. Data Acquisition and Analysis in the Modern Physiology Teaching Laboratory. ($20,000). Funding obtained from California State University Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology (CSUPERB). 2000–2001.
  2. Electrophysiological Screening of Drugs in Xenopus laevis Oocytes. ($20,000). Funding obtained from California State University Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology (CSUPERB). 2001–2002.



Grants Related to the Advancement of Department, College, and University Return to top of page
  1. Kellogg Distinguished Public Lecture Series. Project Co-director. ($210,000). Kellogg Legacy Project Endowment. 2011/12, 2012/13, and 2013/14 academic years.
  2. Environmental Science Education ($100,000) Ernest Prete, Jr. Foundation. 06/2013-06/2014.



Publications Return to top of page
The number of times a publication has been cited is shown in brackets (updated July 2012).

Original Articles
  1. Stiffler, D.F., Eskandari, S. (1994) Blood-gas, acid-base and catecholamine responses to lactic acid infusion in larval and adult Ambystoma tigrinum. J. Comp. Physiol. B 164, 355–361. [2]
  2. Eskandari, S., Stiffler, D.F. (1997) Interrenal function in larval Ambystoma tigrinum. IV. Acid–base balance and the renin–angiotensin system. Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 105, 18–30. [1]
  3. Stiffler, D.F., Eskandari, S., Dejbakhsh, S. (1997) Active transport of Ca2+ in the skin of the frog Rana pipiens: Significance and specificity. J. Exp. Zool. 277, 371–381. [7]
  4. Panayotova-Heiermann, M., Eskandari, S., Turk, E., Zampighi, GA., Wright, EM. (1997) Five transmembrane helices form the sugar pathway through the Na+/glucose cotransporter. J. Biol. Chem. 272, 20324–20327. [68]
  5. Eskandari, S., Loo, D.D.F., Dai, D., Levy, O., Wright, E.M., Carrasco, N. (1997) Thyroid Na+/I- symporter: Mechanism, stoichiometry, and specificity. J. Biol. Chem. 272, 27230–27238. [247]
  6. Eskandari, S., Wright, E.M., Kreman, M., Starace, D.M., Zampighi, G.A. (1998) Structural analysis of cloned plasma membrane proteins by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 11235–11240. [132]
  7. Marvizón, J.-C.G., Eskandari, S., Ennes, H.S., Mayer, E.A. (1998) Substance P induces brief, localized increases in [Ca2+]i in dorsal horn neurons. NeuroReport 9, 3369–3374. [9]
  8. Zampighi, G.A., Loo, D.D.F., Kreman, M., Eskandari, S., Wright, E.M. (1999) Functional and morphological correlates of connexin50 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. J. Gen. Physiol. 113, 507–523. [78]
  9. Forster, I.C., Loo, D.D.F., Eskandari, S. (1999) Stoichiometry and Na+ binding cooperativity of rat and flounder renal type II Na+-Pi cotransporters. Am. J. Physiol. 276 (Renal Physiol. 45), F644–F649. [52]
  10. Eskandari, S., Snyder, P.M., Kreman, M., Zampighi, G.A., Welsh, M.J., Wright, E.M. (1999) Number of subunits comprising the epithelial sodium channel. J. Biol. Chem. 274, 27281–27286. [85]
  11. Weeks, D.L., Eskandari, S., Scott, D.R., Sachs, G. (2000) A H+ gated urea channel: The link between Helicobacter pylori urease and gastric colonization. Science 287, 482–485. [216]
  12. Rektorschek, M., Buhmann, A., Weeks, D., Schwan, D., Bensch, K.W., Eskandari, S., Scott, D., Sachs, G., Melchers, K. (2000) Acid resistance of Helicobacter pylori depends on the UreI membrane protein and an inner membrane proton barrier. Mol. Microbiol. 36, 141–152. [51]
  13. Eskandari, S., Kreman, M., Kavanaugh, M.P., Wright, E.M., Zampighi, G. A. (2000) Pentameric assembly of a neuronal glutamate transporter. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 8641–8646. [95]
  14. Turk, E., Kim, O., le Coutre, J., Whitelegge, J.P., Eskandari, S., Lam, J.T., Kreman, M., Zampighi, G.A., Faull, K.F., Wright, E.M. (2000) Molecular characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus vSGLT: A model for sodium-coupled sugar cotransporters. J. Biol. Chem. 275, 25711–25716. [49]
  15. Zampighi, G.A., Eskandari, S., Kreman, M. (2000) Epithelial organization of the mammalian lens. Exp. Eye Res. 71, 415–435. [58]
  16. Loo, D.D.F., Eskandari, S., Boorer, K.J., Sarkar, H.K., Wright, E.M. (2000) Role of chloride in electrogenic Na+-coupled cotransporters GAT1 and SGLT1. J. Biol. Chem. 275, 37414–37422. [78]
  17. Diez-Sampedro, A., Eskandari, S., Wright, E.M., Hirayama, B.A. (2001) Na+-to-sugar stoichiometry of SGLT3. Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol. 280, F278–F282. [22]
  18. Eskandari, S., Zampighi, G.A., Leung, D.W., Wright, E.M., Loo, D.D.F. (2002) Inhibition of gap junction hemichannels by chloride channel blockers. J. Membr. Biol. 185, 93-102. [78]
  19. Mischel, P.S., Umbach, J.A., Eskandari, S., Smith, S.G., Gundersen, C.B., Zampighi, G.A. (2002) Nerve growth factor signals via preexisting TrkA receptor oligomers. Biophys. J. 83, 968-976. [18]
  20. Sacher, A., Nelson, N., Ogi, J.T., Wright, E.M., Loo, D.D.F., Eskandari, S. (2002) Presteady-state and steady-state kinetics, and turnover rate of the mouse γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (mGAT3). J. Membr. Biol. 190, 57-73. [16]
  21. Zampighi, G.A., Eskandari, S., Hall, J.E., Zampighi, L., Kreman, M. (2002) Micro-domains of AQP0 in lens equatorial fibers. Exp. Eye Res. 75, 505-519. [34]
  22. Zampighi, G.A., Kreman, M., Lanzavecchia, S., Turk, E., Eskandari, S., Zampighi, L., Wright, E.M. (2003) Structure of functional single AQP0 channels in phospholipid membranes. J. Mol. Biol. 325, 201-210. [14]
  23. Whitlow, R.D., Sacher, A., Loo, D.D.F., Nelson, N., Eskandari, S. (2003) The anticonvulsant valproate increases the turnover rate of γ-aminobutyric acid transporters. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 17716-17726. [18]
  24. Gordon, L.M., Mobley, P.W., Lee, W., Eskandari, S., Kaznessis, Y.N., Sherman, M.A., Waring, A.J. (2004) Conformational mapping of the N-terminal peptide of HIV-1 gp41 in lipid detergent and aqueous environments using 13C-enhanced Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Protein Sci. 13, 1012-1030. [30]
  25. Karakossian, M.H., Spencer, S.R., Gomez, A.Q., Padilla, O.R., Sacher, A., Loo, D.D.F., Nelson, N., Eskandari, S. (2005) Novel properties of a mouse γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (GAT4). J. Membr. Biol. 203, 65–82. [17]
  26. Eskandari, S., Wright, E.M., Loo, D.D.F. (2005) Kinetics of the reverse mode of the Na+/glucose cotransporter. J. Membr. Biol. 204, 23–32. [20]
  27. Cohen-Kfir, E., Lee, W., Eskandari, S., Nelson, N. (2005) Zinc inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 4 (GAT4) reveals a link between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102, 6154–6159. [35]
  28. Meyer, A., Eskandari, S., Grallath, S., Rentsch, D. (2006) AtGAT1, a high affinity transporter for γ-aminobutyric acid in Arabidopsis thaliana. J. Biol. Chem. 281, 7197–7204. [30]
  29. Paroder, V., Spencer, S.R., Paroder, M., Arango, D., Schwartz, S., Mariadason, J.M., Augenlicht, L.H., Eskandari, S., Carrasco, N. (2006) Na+/Monocarboxylate transport (SMCT) protein expression correlates with survival in colon cancer: Molecular characterization of SMCT. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 103, 7270–7275. [42]
  30. Livesay, D.R., Kidd, P.D., Eskandari, S., Roshan, U. (2007) Assessing the ability of sequence-based methods to provide functional insight within membrane integral proteins: A case study analyzing the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter family. BMC Bioinformatics 8, 397. [4]
  31. Gonzales, A.L., Lee, W., Spencer, S.R., Oropeza, R.A., Chapman, J.V., Ku, J.Y., Eskandari, S. (2007) Turnover rate of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter GAT1. J. Membr. Biol. 220, 33–51. [5]
  32. Gordon, L.M., Nisthal, A., Lee, A.B., Eskandari, S., Ruchala, P., Jung, C.L., Waring, A.J., Mobley, P.W. (2008) Structural and functional properties of peptides based on the N-terminus of HIV-1 gp41 and the C-terminus of the amyloid-beta protein. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1778, 2127-2137. [9]
  33. Matthews, E. Jr., Rahnama-Vaghef, A., Eskandari, S. (2009) Inhibitors of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 (GAT1) do not reveal a channel mode of conduction. Neurochem. Int. 55, 732-740. [1]
  34. Anderson, C.M., Kidd, P.D., Eskandari, S. (2010) GATMD: γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter Mutagenesis Database. Database 2010, doi: 10.1093/database/baq028. [1]
  35. Paroder-Belenitsky, M., Maestas, M.J., Dohán, O., Nicola, J.P., Reyna-Neyra, A., Follenzi, A., Dadachova, E., Eskandari, S., Amzel, L.M., Carrasco, N. (2011) Mechanism of anion selectivity and stoichiometry of the Na+/I- symporter (NIS). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108, 17933-17938. [0]
  36. Omoto, J.J., Maestas, M.J., Rahnama-Vaghef, A., Choi, Y.E., Sanchez, R.V., Salto, G., Anderson, C.M., Eskandari, S. (2012) Sulfhydryl modification of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 (GAT1) at a single solvent-exposed cysteine residue. J. Membr. Biol. 245, 841-857. [0]

Review Articles and Book Chapters
  1. Wright, E. M., Loo, D. D. F., Panayotova-Heiermann, M., Hirayama, B. A., Turk, E., Eskandari, S., and Lam, J. (1998) Structure and function of the Na+/glucose cotransporter. Acta Physiol. Scand. 163 (Suppl. 643), 257-264. [11]
  2. Eskandari, S., and Zampighi, G. A. (2000) Properties of connexin50 hemichannels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In Gap Junctions. Molecular Basis of Cell Communication in Health and Disease. Current Topics in Membranes. Vol. 49, ed. C. Peracchia, pp. 369-388. [1]
  3. Loo, D. D. F., Eskandari, S., Hirayama, B. A., and Wright, E. M. (2002) A kinetic model for secondary active transport. In Membrane Transport and Renal Physiology. The IMA Volumes in Mathematics and its Applications. Eds. H. E. Layton and A. M. Weinstein, Springer-Verlag, pp. 65-83. [0]
  4. Eskandari, S. (2009) Remarkable commonalities of electrogenic and electroneutral Na+/phosphate cotransporters. J. Physiol. 587, 4131-4132. [1]

Abstracts and Presentations
  1. Eskandari, S., Stiffler, D.F. (1993) A role for the renin–angiotensin system in acid-base balance in Ambystoma tigrinum. American Society of Zoologists meeting, Los Angeles, California. Am. Zool. 33, 44A.
  2. Eskandari, S., Stiffler, D.F. (1994) Recovery of Ambystoma tigrinum from lactacidosis during B1 and B2 blockade. Experimental Biology 94, Anaheim, California. FASEB J. 8, A574.
  3. Eskandari, S., Dejbakhsh, S., Stiffler, D.F. (1995) Responses of frog skin (Rana pipiens) Ca2+ transport to alterations in Ca2+ balance. Experimental Biology 95, Atlanta, Georgia. FASEB J. 9, A355.
  4. Eskandari, S., Toro, L., Stefani, E. (1996) Effect of chemical modification on the gating and ionic currents of the Shaker potassium channel. Biophysical Society meeting, Baltimore, Maryland. Biophys. J. 70, A189.
  5. Eskandari S., Loo, D.D.F., Carrasco, N., Wright, E.M. (1996) Substrate Selectivity of the rat thyroid Na+/I- cotransporter. Annual meeting of the West Coast Salt and Water Club, Morro Bay, California.
  6. Eskandari, S., Marvizon, J.C., Ennes, H.S., Lembo, T., Mayer, E.A. (1996) Desensitization of calcium responses of cultured rat dorsal horn neurons to substance P. Annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association, San Francisco, California. Gastroenterology 110, A1070.
  7. Eskandari S., Zampighi, G.A., Carrasco, N., Wright, E.M. (1997) Identification of the Na+/I- cotransporter in the plasma membrane of Xenopus laevis oocytes. Annual meeting of the West Coast Salt and Water Club, Morro Bay, California.
  8. Eskandari, S., Loo, D.D.F., Dai, G., Levy, O., Carrasco, N., Zampighi, G.A., Wright, E.M. (1997) Characterization of the rat thyroid Na+/I- Symporter. Gordon Conference: Molecular Mechanisms of Membrane Transport Proteins. Plymouth, New Hampshire.
  9. Eskandari, S., Kreman, M., Wright, E.M., Zampighi, G.A. (1998) Determination of the oligomeric assembly of integral membrane proteins. Experimental Biology 98, San Francisco, California. FASEB J. 12, A1013.
  10. Wright, E.M., Hirayama, B.A., Loo, D.D.F., Turk, E., Panayotova-Heiermann, M., Eskandari, S. (1999) Principles of solute/Na+ transporters. International Meeting on Universal Principles of Pro- and Eukaryotic Membrane Transport. Osnabruck, Germany.
  11. Eskandari, S., Loo, D.D.F., Wright, E.M. (1999) Functional asymmetry of the sodium/glucose cotransporter. Experimental Biology 99, Washington, D.C. FASEB J. 13, A399.
  12. Eskandari, S., Loo, D.D.F., Kreman, M., Wright, E.M., Zampighi, G.A. (1999) Unitary properties and trafficking of connexin50 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. 1999 International Gap Junction Conference, Gwatt, Zwitzerland.
  13. Eskandari, S., Loo, D.D.F., Leung, D.W., Zampighi, G.A., Wright, E.M. (2000) Inhibition of lens gap junction hemichannels by chloride channel blockers. Biophysical Society meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana. Biophys. J. 78, A319.
  14. Eskandari, S., Kreman, M., Kavanaugh, M.P., Wright, E.M., Zampighi, G.A. (2000) Pentameric assembly of a neuronal glutamate transporter. Annual meeting of the West Coast Salt and Water Club, Morro Bay, California.
  15. Eskandari, S., Loo, D.D.F., Boorer, K.J., Sarkar, H.K., Wright, E.M. (2000) Role of Cl- in the Na+/Cl-/GABA cotransporter. Experimental Biology 2000, San Diego, California. FASEB J. 14, A350.
  16. Loo, D.D.F., Eskandari, S., Meinild, A.-K., Wright, E.M. (2000) Water and urea transport by the plant H+/amino acid cotransporter. Experimental Biology 2000, San Diego, California. FASEB J. 14, A350.
  17. Eskandari, S., Sacher, A., Loo, D.D.F., Nelson, N. (2001) Functional characterization of the mouse γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (GAT3). Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, California.
  18. Mischel, P.S., Umbach, J.A., Eskandari, S., Smith, S.G., Gundersen, C.B., Zampighi, G.A. (2001) Do TrkA receptors dimerize in response to NGF? Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, California.
  19. Zampighi, G.A., Eskandari, S., Hall, J.E., Zampighi, L., Kreman, M. (2002) Arrangement of AQP0 in the lens: One protein many functions. Biophysical Society meeting, San Francisco, California. Biophys. J. 82, 210a.
  20. Whitlow, R.D., Sacher, A., Loo, D.D.F., Nelson, N., Eskandari, S. (2002) Stimulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (GAT3) by the anticonvulsant valproate. Experimental Biology 2002, New Orleans, Louisiana.
  21. Karakossian, M.H., Ogi, J.T., Sacher, A., Loo, D.D.F., Nelson, N., Eskandari, S. (2002) Presteady-state and steady-state kinetic properties of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter GAT4. Experimental Biology 2002, New Orleans, Louisiana.
  22. Padilla, O.R., Spencer, S.R., Sacher, A., Loo, D.D.F., Nelson, N., Eskandari, S. (2002) Formulation of a substrate pharmacophore for the γ-aminobutyric acid transporters (GAT3 and GAT4). Society for Neuroscience, Orlando, Florida.
  23. Spencer, S.R., Eskandari, S. (2003) Determinants of electrogenicity in γ-aminobutyric acid transporters. Experimental Biology 2003, San Diego, California.
  24. Gomez, A.Q., Lee, W., Errico, M.J., Eskandari, S. (2003) Ion and substrate concentration jumps at the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter. Society for Neuroscience, New Orleans, Louisiana.
  25. Lee, W., Oropeza, R.A., Ford, E.R., Eskandari, S. (2004) Turnover rates of γ-aminobutyric acid transporters. Experimental Biology 2004, Washington, D.C.
  26. Gomez, A.Q., Lee, W., Chapman, J.V., Errico, M.J., Loo, D.D.F., Eskandari, S. (2004) A novel method for rapid concentration jumps around intact, voltage-clamped Xenopus laevis oocytes. Experimental Biology 2004, Washington, D.C.
  27. Spencer, S.R., Eskandari, S. (2004) Uncoupled cation and anion permeation through the mouse γ-aminobutyric acid transporter mGAT4. Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, California.
  28. Mobley, P.W, Perez-Munoz, L., Nisthal, A., Gonzales, A.L., Eskandari, S., Waring, A.J., Gordon, L.M. (2005) Effects of sequential proline substitutions on the ‘amyloid’ properties of the HIV-1 fusion peptide. 19th American Peptide Society Symposium, San Diego, California.
  29. Meyer, A., Eskandari, S., Rentsch, D. (2005) AtGAT1, a high affinity GABA transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana. 14th Swiss Plant Molecular Biology and Cell Biology Conference, Les Diablerets, Switzerland.
  30. Nisthal, A., Lee, A.B., Gonzales, A.L., Eskandari, S., Waring, A.J., Gordon, L.M., Mobley, P.W. (2005) Comparative structural and functional studies on peptides based on the HIV-1 fusion domain and the amyloid beta protein. Protein Society Meeting, Boston, Massachusetts.
  31. Gonzales, A.L., Lee, W., Spencer, S.R., Oropeza, R.A., Ford, E.R., Eskandari, S. (2005) Turnover rate of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter GAT1. Society for Neuroscience, Washington, D.C.
  32. Mobley, P.W., Nisthal, A., Lee, A., Julius, J., Eskandari, S., Waring, A.J., Gordon, L.M. (2006) Comparative structural and functional studies on peptides based on the N-terminal HIV-1 fusion domain and the amyloid β-protein. Protein Society Meeting, San Diego, California.
  33. Oropeza, R.A., Cossette, A.D., Gomez, A.Q., Eskandari, S. (2006) Transient currents evoked by rapid application of Na+ and GABA to the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter GAT4. Society for Neuroscience, Atlanta, Georgia.
  34. Livesay, D.R., Kidd, P.D., Eskandari, S., Roshan, U. (2007) Assessing the ability of sequence-based methods to provide functional insight within membrane integral proteins: A case study analyzing the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter family. Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, California.
  35. Maestas, M.J., Dohán, O., Paroder, M., Nicola, J.P., Eskandari, S., Carrasco, N. (2008) Residue at position 93 of the Na+/iodide symporter (NIS) plays a critical role in Na+/substrate coupled transport. Experimental Biology 2008, San Diego, California.
  36. Kidd, P.D., Anderson, C.M., Muster, N., Eskandari, S. (2010) GATMD: γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter Mutagenesis Database. Experimental Biology 2010, Anaheim, California.
  37. Omoto, J.J., Maestas, M.J., Rahnama-Vaghef, A., Anderson, C.M., Eskandari, S. (2010) Functional consequences of sulfhydryl modification of the γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 (GAT1) at a single solvent-exposed cysteine residue. Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, California.
  38. Anderson, C.M., Sanchez, R.V., Eskandari, S. (2011) A mutagenesis database prototype for Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters. Society for Neuroscience, Washington, D.C.
  39. Sanchez, R.V., Anderson, C.M., Eskandari, S. (2012) Transient currents evoked by rapid extracellular application of cosubstrates to the GABA transporter GAT1. Society for Neuroscience, New Orleans, Louisiana.



Invited Presentations Return to top of page
  1. Institute of Physiology, University of Zurich, Switzerland. September, 1999.
  2. Department of Biology, California State University, San Bernardino. November, 1999.
  3. Biological Sciences Department, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. February, 2000.
  4. Minority Biomedical Research Support Seminar Series, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. October, 2001, November 2003.
  5. Biological Sciences Seminar Series. Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles. November, 2005.
  6. On Teaching Physiology at Cal Poly Pomona. 6th Annual College of Science Award Seminar for Teaching Excellence. California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. December, 2005.
  7. Program in Biology, California State University, Channel Islands. March, 2006.
  8. Basic Medical Sciences Seminar Series, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific, Western University of Health Sciences. January, 2008.
  9. Department of Biology, California State University, San Bernardino. October, 2008.
  10. Science Lecture Series, Saddleback College, Mission Viejo, California. February, 2010.
  11. Department of Biological Science, California State University, Fullerton. December, 2010.
  12. 2011 Biotechnology Faculty Research Award Lecture. California State University Biotechnology Symposium, Garden Grove, California. January, 2011.
  13. Annual meeting of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS), San Diego, California. October, 2011.
  14. Biological Sciences Department, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. March, 2012.
  15. College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, May, 2013.



Professional Service Return to top of page
Peer-reviews have been conducted for the following journals:
  • American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology
  • Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences
  • Future Medicinal Chemistry
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
  • Journal of Membrane Biology
  • Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology
  • Journal of Physiology (London)
  • Journal of Structural Biology
  • Molecular Psychiatry
  • Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
  • Trends in Neurosciences
  • UCSD - Nature Signaling Gateway

Peer-reviews have been conducted for the following book publishers:
  • McGraw Hill




Last updated on: Sunday, June 30, 2013