Marie-Guillemine Benoist (1768-1826): Marie-Guillemine Benoist was the daughter of a government official. She studied with Vigee-Lebrun and her earlier works show a distinct influence of her famous teacher. Benoist later studied with the celebrated Jacques-Louis David and her later works reflect the Neo-Classical style.During her lifetime, Benoist painted in several genres ranging from historical themes to family portraiture.Her works also included subjects that touched upon the contemporary issues of her day:her Portrait of a Negress, painted in 1800,for instance, was inspired by the decree to abolish slavery.Benoist was commissioned by Napolean to paint his portrait as well as portraits of his family members.
References: Women Artists: An Illustrated History by Nancy G. Heller, pp.63-64.


Maria Cosway (1760-1838): Maria Cosway was born in Florence, Italy to English parents. Gifted as an artist as well as a musician, she married Richard Cosway, a painter to the Court of the English royal family in 1779. Despite the training she received and the fact she exhibited over thirty paintings at the Royal Academy, her artistic gifts were gradually stifled by her husband's reluctance to allow her to continue her artistic pursuits.During her periodic visits to Paris she met, and subsequently became involved in a love affair with Thomas Jefferson. Cosway went on to found schools for girls in Lyons, France and in Lodi.
References: Seeing Ourselves: Women's Self-Portraits by Frances Borzello, pp.100-101; Women, Art and Society, by Whitney Chadwick, p.149.


Marie Nicole Dumont (1767-1846): Marie Nicole Dumont was born in Paris,the daughter of an artist.Following her marriage to the painter Francois Dumont, the couple were given living quarters in the Louvre by King Louis IX. dumont's works were exhibited at the Paris Salon.
References: Seeing Ourselves: Women's Self-Portraits by Frances Borzello, pp. 34, 79.


Francoise Duparc(1726-1778): Francoise Duparc was born in Spain, the daughter of a Spanish mother and French father. Her father, Antoine, was a sculptor by profession and it is presumed she and her sister, who also followed a career as an artist, were trained by him. As an adult Duparc returned to France where she worked professionally. Her paintings are influenced by the Dutch style where the subjects of paintings are based on people in everyday life. Duparc's paintings are of women sewing, people engaging in work-a-day activities. She was elected to the Academy of Marseilles in 1777.
References: Women, Art and Society, by Whitney Chadwick, p.148; Women Artists: An Illustrated History by Nancy G. Heller, pp. 64, 66, 67.


Marguerite Gerard (1761-1837): Marguerite Gerard was born in Grasse and tutored by her brother-in-law Jean-Honore Fragonard. By the 1780's she had become recognized as a leading artist in annual salon exhibits. Gerard herself was an attractive woman who was also in demand as a model for other artists. She specialized in paintings of domestic scenes, and like Mary Cassat, frequently painted works depicting mothers and children.
References: Seeing Ourselves: Women's Self-Portraits by Frances Borzello, pp. 83,86; Women, Art and Society, by Whitney Chadwick, p.168,170; Women Artists: 1550-1950, by Ann Sutherland Harris and Linda Nochlin, pp 197-198; Women Artists: An Illustrated History by Nancy G. Heller, pp. 68, 68.
Web Sites About Marguerite Gerard
The Paintings of Marguerite Gerard


Marie-Eleonore Godefroid (1778-1849):Marie-Eleonore Godefroid was the daughter of the artist Francois Ferdinand Godefroid.She began her career in the studio of Francois Gerard where she assisted him in his works while developing her skills as a portrait painter. Godefroid eventually came to specialize in portraits of women and children.She was commissioned by prominent Parisians and one of her best-known works is the painting ofThe Sons of Marshall Ney.
References: Women Artists:An Illustrated History by Nancy G. Heller, pp. 82-83.


Ann Hall (1792-1863):Ann Hall was born in Connecticut. She specialized in miniatures and was often compared to Joshua Reynolds. She was the first woman to be admitted to the National Academy of Design.
References:
Women Artists: An Illustrated History by Nancy G. Heller, p.82.


Angelica Kauffman (1741-1807): Angelica Kauffman was first trained by her father and then studied art in Italy. She came to England in 1766 where she followed a career as a professional artist. She was a founding member of the Royal Academy. She later went to Rome where she received royal commissions. Trained in the Neo-classical tradition, Kaufmann's works involved Greco-Roman and allegorical subjects. She was also a portrait painter, but was equally skilled in the rendering of abstract themes.
References: Seeing Ourselves: Women's Self-Portraits by Frances Borzello, pp. 79-82; Women, Art and Society, by Whitney Chadwick, pp. 152-160; Women Artists: An Illustrated History by Nancy G. Heller, pp.52,55,57,80; Angelica Kauffmann by Dorothy Moulton; Women Artists, by Wendy Slatkin, pp. 82-86.


Adelaide Labille-Guiard (1749-1803): Adelaide Labille-Guiard was born in Paris and trained as a miniaturist with Francois Elie Vincent. She was an exact contemporary of Marie Louise Elisabeth Vigee Lebrun and both women enjoyed successful careers as artists. They were both admitted to the Academie Royale and were purportedly engaged in a professional rivalry with each other. Unlike Lebrun, Labille Guillard's subjects included both the members of the aristocracy as well as revolutionary figures.
References: Seeing Ourselves: Women's Self-Portraits by Frances Borzello, pp.22-21; Women, Art and Society, by Whitney Chadwick, pp. 164-165; Women Artists: An Illustrated History by Nancy G. Heller, pp.60-63; Adelaide Labille-Guillard, 1749-1803: Bibliographie et catalogue raisonne de son oeuvre by Anne-Maire Passez; Women Artists, by Wendy Slatkin, pp. 72.


Marie-Victoire Lemoine( 1754-1820): Marie-Victoire Lemoine was born in Pair and may have been a student of Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun. Her painting Atelier of a Painter is probably a portrait of Vigee-Lebrun. Lemoine was a portraitist and miniaturist who was part of a generation of women who were able to enjoyed considerable success as professional artists. Lemoine's career spanned the periods both before and after the French revolution.
References: Seeing Ourselves: Women's Self-Portraits by Frances Borzello, pp.83-84; Women Artists: 1550-1950 by Anne Sutherland Harris and Linda Nochlin, pp. 188-189.
Web Sites About Marie-Victoire Lemoine
Lemoine's Portrait of Zamor


Constance Mayer (1775-1821): Constance Mayer was born in Paris and was taught by J.B. Suvee and Jean-Baptiste Greuze. Her artistic collaborations with Prud'hon has made it somewhat difficult to definitively attribute which works were hers and which Prud'hon's. Mayer specialized in portrayals of melodramatic and allegorical themes.
References: Women Artists: An Illustrated History by Nancy G. Heller, pp.68-69.


Rolinda Sharples (1793-1838): Rolinda Sharples was born in New York in 1793. Both her parents, James and Ellen were artists. Sharples in regarded as America's first woman artist although she lived out her adult life in Bristol, England. Sharples painted portraits as well as contemporary events. One of her larger works was The Trial of Colonel Brereton painted in 1834.
References: Seeing Ourselves: Women's Self-Portraits by Frances Borzello, pp.104-107; Women Artists: An Illustrated History by Nancy G. Heller, pp.74-75; The Sharples by K. McCook Knox.


Anna Dorothea Lisiewska-Therbusch (1721-1782): Anna Dorothea Therbush was born in Berlin of Polish descent. Her first teacher was her father Georg Lesiewski. She later was taught by Anton Pesne in Paris. From 1761-62 she was painter to the Count of Wurttemburg. She later became the court painter to the Elector of the Palatine.After moving to Paris she was elected to the Academie Royale in 1767. Later in her life she was appointed to the court of the Empress of Russia and to King Frederick II of Prussia. Therbush's sister Rosina de Gase Lisiewska was also an accomplished and successful artist.
References: Seeing Ourselves: Women's Self-Portraits by Frances Borzello, pp.72-73.


Anne Valleyer-Costa(1744-1818): Anne Valleyer-Costa's early success as an artist--she was elected to the French Academie Royale when she was only twenty-six--is attributed to the recognition of still-life paintings as a viable artistic genre in eighteenth century France. Valleyer-Costa's works are varied in terms of their subject matter. Her still-life works included representations of eveyday objecs such as fruits, game, bread and cheese as well as luxury objects and exotic arrangements such as her still-life with lobsters and silver covered glass ware. Valleyer-Costa enjoyed the patronage of Queen Marie-Antoinette and managed, despite her royalist connections, to survive the French Revolution.
References: Women, Art and Society by Whitney Cahdwick, pp. 161-164; Women Artists: An Illustrated History by Nancy G. Heller, p.71.


Elisabeth-Louise Vigee-Lebrun (1755-1842): Elisabeth-Louise Vigee-Lebrun was born in Paris in 1755. She was perhaps the most successful woman painter of her time enjoying the patronage of Queen Marie-Antoinette as well as that of other European nobility. She painted many portraits of the ill-fated Marie-Anoinette including one of the queen and her children which was commissioned as a desperate effort to salvage the queen's bad reputation. Vigee-Lebrun left France just before the revolution but returned later to continue her career. Despite her royalist associations, she was able to garner continued acceptance as an artist by the post-revolutionary regime and to be elected to the Academie Royale.
References: Elisabeth-Louise Vigee-Lebrun by Joseph Baillio; Seeing Ourselves: Women's Self-Portraits by Frances Borzello, pp.71-78 Women, Art and Society by Whitney Cahdwick, pp. 165-173; Women Artists: An Illustrated History by Nancy G. Heller, pp. 58-60; The Exceptional Woman: Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun and the Cultural Politics of Art by M. D. Sheriff.
Web Sites About Elisabeth-Louise Vigee-Lebrun Marie Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun
The Art of Elisabeth Louise Vigee-Lebrun
Marie Elisabeth Louise Vigee-Lebrun on the Internet