Research of Matthew S. Povich
Three different views of the M17 nebula and environs, from my proposal to observe the area north of M17 (yellow circle) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This figure illustrates the both the difficulty of identifying cluster members in infrared (IR) observations of crowded star fields and the bright diffuse X-ray emission produced by the massive stars in M17. The panels are: (top left) soft-X-ray image from ROSAT; (bottom left) zoomed-in near-IR image of the proposed target area from the UKIDSS survey; and (right) image combining mid-IR from the Spitzer Space Telescope (red-yellow), X-rays from prior Chandra observations (blue, with cyan dots marking X-ray point sources), and CO line emission from the Heinrich Hertz Telescope in Arizona (contours). In all panels, the diamonds mark the locations of OB stars.

Research of Matthew S. Povich

Smoothed image from my Chandra observation of the area north of M17. Soft X-rays are red and hard X-rays are green. Positions of 441 X-ray point sources are marked by cyan crosses, and previously-cataloged OB stars are marked by diamonds. These stars probably represent a young stellar association that formed before the massive cluster in the M17 nebula to the south. The northern terminus of the diffuse, soft X-ray emission emanating from M17 is apparent in the lower part of this image.

Research of Matthew S. Povich

Near-infrared (blue=J, green=H, red=Ks) image of the embedded massive star cluster W3(OH). I took this image in 2009 as part of an observing program using the WIYN High-resolution InfraRed Camera (WHIRC) at Kitt Peak National Observatory. This may be the highest-resolution image of this particular star cluster obtained to date (seeing was better than 0.5”), a distinction that might also be claimed by my WHIRC images of several other clusters observed for the same program.