Regenerating Los Angeles

606 Studio Projects in the Los Angeles Region

 

DEPARTMENT MISSION

The Department of Landscape Architecture at Cal Poly Pomona prepares students to resolve the ecological and social challenges of the 21st century, by instilling the theoretical and technical knowledge base of landscape architecture, creative and critical thinking skills, and a sense of social responsibility.

 

Department Vision and Values

The Department of Landscape Architecture at Cal Poly Pomona explicitly recognizes the serious challenges facing human kind in the 21st century: rapidly expanding population pressures in the context of finite, non-renewable resources; and an increasingly multicultural society. We believe that these issues are fundamental, placing concepts of regeneration, livability, justice and sustainability at the forefront of the environmental design agenda.

Hydrologic Function

In many respects, the los angeles region is a bellwether, an early indicator of issues, patterns and processes that will become prevalent in many parts of the world during this century. As such, the department is uniquely situated to be a leader in "Re-generating L.A." and educating future landscape architectural professionals to meet these challenges. To this end, the Department strives to be a center of creative excellence in landscape architecture, internationally recognized for communicating values of ecological and social sustainability to students and the community.

Laguna Beach ConceptThe department has developed five strategies that are intended serve as the long-range goals for the department. These five strategies are the core goals of the department, connecting the mission and vision, and guiding future decisions and directives. These strategies are broad with the specific intention of flexibility; allowing the program to respond to trends within our context, both administratively and geographically.

1. Support a strong undergraduate program focusing on the development of sound thinking skills and personal vision, in the context of the broad range of landscape architectural activities and technical skills.

2. Support a strong graduate program focusing on the development of sound thinking skills, personal vision, and contribution to the discipline¡¯s knowledge base, with a particular emphasis on human ecosystematic design principles.

3. Foster an outstanding and well-rounded cadre of faculty who contribute to the department's mission through teaching, research, community service, and professional practice.

4. Recruit and retain a critical mass of high-caliber, diverse students for graduate and undergraduate study.

5. Maintain a respected and influential role within the college, university, profession, and region.

The department has identified a number of specific learning objectives to support the long-term goals of the department. These objectives serve as the benchmarks by which our department, programs, students and faculty are measured and identified within the broader discipline of landscape architecture and across the university. It is intended that these discipline-specific objectives ensure accomplishment of the university learning outcomes.

 

Strategy 1: support a strong undergraduate program focusing on the development of sound thinking skills and personal vision, in the context of the broad range of landscape architectural activities and technical skills.

Objectives:

1A. Foster creative and critical thinking skills within students, as well as the application of these skills to resolve ecological, social and aesthetic problems, within the context of environmental design.

1B. Foster a sense of responsibility in students, related to ecological, social, aesthetic and professional issues.

1C. Provide students with a strong foundation in design, including an understanding of fundamental principles, form and space creation, design process, and its application to the broad spectrum of landscape architectural activities.

1D. Provide students with a strong understanding of natural patterns and processes at multiple scales, and an awareness of design and planning strategies to address ecological problems, including, preservation, restoration, regenerative design and sustainable use of resources.

1E. Provide students with a strong understanding of cultural patterns and processes at multiple scales, and an awareness of challenges and strategies related to planning and design within a multi-cultural society.

1F. Pursue challenging educational and service opportunities within southern california, taking advantage of its diverse ecological environment, in the context of one of the world's largest multicultural communities.

1G. Expose students to a variety of professional roles and contexts, including individual and team projects, as well as interdisciplinary collaboration.

1H. Instill within students the technical skills and knowledge necessary for landscape design, planning, construction, and professional practice with regards to ecological sustainability, efficiency, practicality and the protection of public health, safety and welfare..

1I. Instill hands-on computer proficiency in students, as well as an understanding and awareness of innovations in information technology, and their implications for planning and design process and product.

 

Strategy 2: Support a strong graduate program focusing on the development of sound thinking skills, personal vision, and contribution to the discipline's knowledge base, with a particular emphasis on human eco-systematic design principles.

Objectives:

2A. Foster creative and critical thinking skills within students, as well as the application of these skills to resolve ecological, social and aesthetic problems, within the context of environmental design.

2B. Foster a sense of responsibility in students, related to ecological, social, aesthetic and professional issues.

2C. Provide students with a strong foundation in sustainability, regeneration, and ecosystematic design.

2D. Provide students with a strong understanding of ecological patterns and processes at multiple scales, and an awareness of design and planning strategies to address ecological problems, including, preservation, restoration, regenerative design and sustainable use of resources.

2E. Provide students with a strong understanding of cultural patterns and processes at multiple scales, and an awareness of challenges and strategies related to planning and design within a multi-cultural society.

2F. Pursue challenging educational and service opportunities within southern california, taking advantage of its diverse ecological environment, in the context of one of the world¡¯s largest multicultural communities.

2G. Expose students to a variety of professional roles and contexts, including individual and team projects, as well as interdisciplinary collaboration.

2H. Instill within students the technical skills and knowledge necessary for landscape design, planning, construction, and professional practice at all scales of concern, with regards to ecological sustainability, efficiency, practicality and the protection of public health, safety and welfare.

2I. Instill computer proficiency in students, as well as an understanding and awareness of innovations in information technology, and their implications for planning and design process and product.

2J. Develop the ability to pursue scholarly research within students.

 

Strategy 3: Foster an outstanding and well-rounded cadre of faculty who contribute to the department's mission through teaching, research, community service, and professional practice.

Objectives:

3A. Foster a diverse full-time faculty possessing skills and perspectives deemed critical to maintaining the department's knowledge base, vision, values, and mission.

3B. Foster a diverse and stable part-time faculty possessing skills and perspectives that complement the contributions of full-time faculty.

3C. Seek to maintain excellence in teaching within the department, consistent with university standards.

3D. Foster research and scholarly activities among faculty members.

3E. Support creative activities and professional practice among full and part-time faculty members.

3F. Ensure continued service to the university and college by faculty, on behalf of the department.

3G. Support community service by faculty on behalf of the department.

3H. Actively support professional development of all faculty, particularly probationary and part-time faculty.

3I. Maintain faculty resources so that faculty can remain on the cutting edge of teaching, research and service.

 

Strategy 4: recruit and retain a critical mass of high-caliber, diverse students for graduate and undergraduate study.

Objectives:

4A. Actively recruit high-quality graduate and undergraduate students in cost-effective ways, including the department web page, media contacts, advertisements, and involving alumni.

4B. Seek to increase enrollments in populations more representative of the southern california region.

4C. Increase student retention rates, through examination of attrition causes and rates.

4D. Provide well-equipped, lighted, maintained facilities for student work and critiques, and utilize university facilities for presentations that reflect the professionalism of student work.

4E. Utilize off-campus opportunities as teaching and learning environments, through field trips, service learning projects, study abroad programs,and internships.

4F. Foster "vertical" (between years in the graduate and undergraduate programs, as well as alumni) and "horizontal" (between graduate students and other disciplines) interaction and learning opportunities.

 

Strategy 5: maintain a respected and influential role within the college, university, profession, and region.

Objectives:

5A. Involve alumni and other professional groups, such as asla or cela, in articulating the importance of the program on a national and regional level.

5B. Encourage promotion of the program through increased visibility of student, faculty, and alumni work.

5C. Encourage "colleagueship" between graduates of the department.

5D. Meet regularly with the dean and encourage faculty participation on university committees to convey the importance of the small but critical profession.

5E. Enhance the planning, development and management of resources within the department.

 

Standards and learning objectives

The department has developed six fundamental standards in response to our stated mission and vision. These standards were adapted to serve as benchmark learning outcomes by which our students can be measured. These standards can be seen as a set of discipline specific learning objectives that ensure acquisition of the university learning outcomes.

 

Standard 1: Local Context

Establish a fundamental understanding of the local context through immersion of place.

*Cultivate a fundamental understanding and appreciation of local context complexity in order to respond with authenticity to ecological, social, and formal qualities.

*Discern patterns and systems at all scales.

*Recognize resources and inequities.

 

Standard 2: Ethics

Develop (foster) within students the professional values and ethics to critically assess actions and implications.

*Develop and refine ethical system regarding environmental alteration and management.

*Develop an understanding of the ethical implications of short and long-term decision-making concerning the environment.

*Develop a process of assessing values and their effect on environmental and landscape quality.

 

Standard 3: Critical Thinking

Foster critical thinking that enables creative and balanced judgments in:

*Inclusive investigation that engages the sciences and arts.

*Appropriate and defensible applications.

*Reflective criticism that drives creative problem solving.

 

Standard 4: Vision

Maintain a "contemporary" curriculum that facilitates the recognition of the dynamic relationships and long-term consequences of complex systems that produce emergent visions of landscape. In order to critically assess these visions and communicate them to others, the curriculum shall promote appropriate representation.

*Engage the greater influence of the arts (including but not limited to painting, sculpture, installation, photography, collage, poetry, literature and film).

*Employ relevant methods of communication from the kindred arts and sciences.

*Engage innovative professional tools and materials.

*Inculcate a comprehensive understanding of histories and theories.

*Recognize that visionary results stem from persistence - doing your homework - as well as recognizing opportunities.

 

Standard 5: Enterprise

Establish a mentality that supports the notion that individuals should possess the tools and resources to recognize systems and connections and to act as an agent for change.

*Appraise opportunities in the context of ethical concerns.

*Comprehend the issue of risk in enterprise, as both a necessity and management responsibility.

*Understand that the issues of creative enterprise must engage inclusiveness in the distribution of gains.

 

Standard 6: Collaboration

Recognize that landscape problems extend across multiple geographical, cultural, and disciplinary boundaries. By working with individuals and groups towards common goals, we realize values, broaden resources and enrich experiences. Effective problem-solving requires the ability to see different viewpoints, to engage interfaces, and to exchange ideas.

*Provide cross-cultural experiences.

*Encourage inter-disciplinary collaboration.

*Create team-work opportunities.

*Stress communication skills between disciplines.

*Cultivate open minds and broadened viewpoints.