Contents
Cal Poly Pomona

Automotive Hazardous Waste

Welcome to the page for automotive hazardous waste created by the Environmental Health & Safety department. The purpose of this page is to provide individuals working in automotive areas on campus with information on the proper management of hazardous waste that is routinely generated during automotive work. This information will assit them in working safely, protecting the environment and avoiding costly regulatory action.

The Table of Automotive Hazardous Waste below lists wastes, that are generated during automotive work, which are typically classified as hazardous waste and must be managed appropriately. You can click on each waste to access additonal information regarding the waste.

Management of Automotive Hazardous Wastes - Labeling & Accumulation

To properly dispose of Automotive Hazardous Waste and other Hazardous Wastes:

  1. Prepare a properly labeled container, which is compatible and non-leaking for the collection of the waste by:

      • Completing a Hazardous Waste Tracking Form (EH&S F-366-07), available from Environmental Health & Safety (Extension 4697), for each container. Make sure the following critical information is completed on the form: Hazardous Material Name, Quantity (Note: The size of the container determines the quantity.), California Waste Code, Waste Classification, Safety Handling Precautions and Initial Accumulation Date. The "Automotive Waste Table" below contains the Hazardous Material Name, California Waste Code, Waste Classification and Safety Handling Precautions for the common names of Aurtomotive Hazardous Waste. A Web Based Training Presentation with instructions on completing the Hazardous Waste Tracking Form is available on the Environmental Health & Safety Web Page at http://www.csupomona.edu/~ehs/greenform/player.html.

      • Temporarily tape the completed form on the container before adding waste. Instead of taping the entire form to the container, you can remove the last page of the Hazardous Waste Tracking Form, which is the label for the container and tape the label to the container before adding any waste.
  2. Place the Hazardous Waste into the labeled container.

  3. Incompatible Wastes shall be kept segregated and managed appropriately in separate containers.

  4. Make sure the lid is closed on the container when you are not adding waste.

  5. Handle all waste in a manner that minimizes breakage, prevents fire, explosion, and the unauthorized release of any Hazardou Waste to the environment.

  6. Immediately clean up and place in a labeled container, as specified above, any waste that is spilled.

  7. When the container is either full or 90 days after the initial accumulation date, call the Environmental Health & Safety Department at Extension 4697 and make arrangements to have the waste picked up or transported to the Hazardous Materials Facility within 3 days.

Management of Automotive Hazardous Wastes in Tanks

  • A tank system is the tank and any associated ancillary equipment, such as connected pipes, valves and fittings, and containment system.
  • For those generators with cathodic protection systems, these systems must be inspected annually and all sources of impressed current must be inspected and/or tested as appropriate at least bimonthly.
  • Tank systems must be inspected daily ( A Hazardous Waste Tank System Daiy Inspection Log is available in the Appendix of the Hazardous Waste Manual) for the following parts of the system:
      • Any overfill/spill control equipment to ensure that it is in good working order; 
      • The aboveground portions of the tank system to detect corrosion or release of waste;
      • Data gathered from monitoring and leak-detection equipment to ensure that the tank system is being operated according to its design;
      • The construction materials and the area immediately surrounding the externally accessible portions of the tank system including secondary containment structures to detect erosion or signs of releases of hazardous waste; and
      • For uncovered tanks, the level of waste in the tank to ensure maintenance of sufficient freeboard (2 feet) to prevent overtopping unless the tank is equipped with a containment structure, drainage control systems or diversion structure that equals or exceeds the volume of the top 2 feet of the tank.
  • If any of the above are found:
      • The leaking tank or secondary containment systems should be immediately removed from service and the release cleaned up.
      • Inform the Environmental Health & Safety Department at Extension 4697 about any releases. Certain reporting requirements may apply depending on the size of the release and extent of contamination to the air, ground and/or water sources.

Management of Automotive Hazardous Wastes- Training

  • Individuals must successfully complete training whether in a classroom setting or as on-the-job training that shall teach them how to handle, store and manage the hazardous waste as part of their job duties.
  • Individuals should complete this training prior to working with hazardous waste. However, individuals must successfully complete this training within six months after the date of their employment or assignment. Individuals shall not work in unsupervised positions until they have completed the requirements of the training program.
  • Individuals are required to take part in an annual review of the initial training. The classroom instruction or on-the-job-training shall:
          • Be directed by a person trained in hazardous waste management procedures, and shall include instruction which teaches facility personnel hazardous waste management procedures relevant to the positions in which they are working.
          • At a minimum be designed to ensure that facility personnel are able to respond effectively to emergencies by familiarizing them with emergency procedures, emergency equipment, and emergency systems, including where applicable.
  • Training records on current personnel shall be kept until closure of the facility.
  • Training records on former employees shall be kept for at least three years from the date the employee last worked at the facility.
  • Copies of training records shall be sent to the Environmental Health & Safety Department.
  • Hazardous Waste Training at the University is available as Web Based or Classroom Training. Information about the training is available on the Environmental Health & Safety Web Page at http://www.csupomona.edu/~ehs/training.html.

Automotive Hazardous Waste Table

Common Name of Hazardous Waste

Hazardous Material Name for Labeling

California Waste Code

Waste Classification

Safety/Handling Precautions

Aerosol Cans (Non-empty)

Universal Waste-Aerosol Cans 343 Poison 6.1 and/or Flammable Liquid Class 3 • Avoid Heat & Open Flames

Anti-Freeze

Anti-Freeze 134 Poison Avoid Skin and Eye Contact

Brake Fluid

Brake Fluid 213 Poison Avoid Skin and Eye Contact

Brake Pads/Shoes (Containing Asbestos)\

Note: Effective January 1, 2014, the sale of brake pads containing more than: 0.01% Cadmium, 0.1% Chromium VI Salts, 0.1% Lead, 0.1% Mercury or 0.1% Asbestos is prohibited.  However, motor vehicle manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers, or retailers of replacement brake pads have until December 21, 2023 to deplete inventory

Asbestos Brake Pads 151 Misc. Haz Mat Poison

Fuel Filters

Used Gasoline Filters or Used Diesel Filters 213 Flammable Liquid

Avoid Skin and Eye Contact

Avoid Heat and/or Open Flame

Lamps

Universal Waste-Lamps m003 Poison Avoid Skin and Eye Contact

Lead-Acid Batteries

Lead Acid Batteries 724 Corrosive Material Avoid Skin and Eye Contact

Motor Oil Waste

Used Oil 221 Flammable Liquid

Avoid Skin and Eye Contact

Avoid Heat and/or Open Flame

Oil Filters

Drained Used Oil Filters 221 Flammable Liquid

Avoid Skin and Eye Contact

Avoid Heat and/or Open Flame

Paints

Paint Waste 461 Flammable Liquid or Poison

Avoid Skin and Eye Contact

Avoid Heat and/or Open Flame

Used Rags/Other Absorbents

Solvent Oil Rags 213 Flammable Solid Avoid Heat and/or Open Flame

Wheel Weights

Lead Wheel Weights Only - Scrap Metal 724 Poison Avoid Ingestion

Aerosol Cans (Non-empty)

  • Various products contained in aerosol cans are used in the automotive shop. Some examples of these products are spray lubricants, spray carburetor cleaner, spray paint, etc.
  • Most of these spray products are flammable and some are poisonous and are considered hazardous and should be reused, recycled, or disposed of properly.
  • For the above reasons this waste is managed as a hazardous waste at the university.

Anti-Freeze

  • Ethylene glycol is the most widely used automotive cooling-system antifreeze, although methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, and propylene glycol are also used.
  • When contaminated, particularly with lead, used antifreeze can be considered hazardous and should be reused, recycled, or disposed of properly.
  • For the above reasons this waste is managed as a hazardous waste at the university.

Brake Fluid

  • Brake fluids are not inherently hazardous, but if they contain certain additives, or if they have become contaminated with brake cleaner or other solvents, they can fall under the hazardous waste rules.
  • Even if brake fluid started out as non-hazardous, it can become hazardous if it is contaminated with brake cleaner or other solvents.
  • Brake fluid is not crude oil-based and therefore it cannot be added to and managed with used oil.
  • Don't spray brake cleaner around brake fluid.
  • For the above reasons this waste is managed as a hazardous waste.

Brake Pads/Shoes

  • Starting in 2014, you will be able to see marking on the product to show that the material meets cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury or asbestos restrictions.
  • If brake-pads are not labeled as indicated manage them as a hazardous waste.
  • Keep in mind that motor vehicle manufacturers, distributors and wholesalers, or retailers of replacement brake pads have until December 21, 2023 to deplete inventory.

Fuel Filters

  • Fuel filters are usually diesel or gasoline fiilters.
  • Used fuel filters must be drained of all free-flowing fuel before they are placed in storage containers. The term “free-flowing” means a continuous stream of used fuel from the filter when it is turned over. Used fuel that flows drop-by-drop is not considered to be free-flowing.
  • When the accumulated filters contain residues of diesel the accumulation container must be labled “Used Diesel Filters".
  • When the accumulated filters contain residues of gasoline, additional requirements apply. Such filters:
    • The container must be labeled “Used Gasoline Filters."
    • Must be stored in containers designed to prevent the ignition of gasoline.

Lamps

  • Lighting products can contain toxic materials that, if released, can be harmful to public health and the environment. For example, incandescent bulbs may contain lead and fluorescent bulbs and tubes contain mercury.
  • These are all to be treated as universal hazardous wastes.

Lead-Acid Batteries

  • Lead-Acid Batteries contain sulfuric acid and lead.
  • Undamaged batteries should be stored upright on a covered pallet over a non-reactive, curbed and sealed surface such as coated concrete or asphalt, and care should be taken to prevent the terminals from short-circuiting.
  • Damaged batteries are batteries that are cracked, broken, or missing one or more caps. You must store and transport damaged batteries in non-reactive, structurally-secure, closed containers such as polyethylene buckets or drums.
  • You must label the container holding damaged batteries (see Management of Automotive Hazardous Wastes - Labeling & Accumulation above).

Motor Oil Waste

  • Motor Oil is usually contaminated with physical or chemical impurities (e.g. Lead and other heavy metals).
  • Regulations require that used oil be managed as a hazardous waste in California unless it has been recycled and is shown to meet the specifications for recycled oil in Health and Safety Code section 25250.1(b), or qualifies for a recycling exclusion under Health and Safety Code section 25143.2.
  • Motor Oil Waste must be confined in a labeled container or tank (see Management of Automotive Hazardous Wastes - Labeling & Accumulation and Management of Automotive Hazardous Wastes in Tanks above).

Oil Filters

  • Used oil filters may exhibit hazardous characteristics for lead; other heavy metals and petroleum-derived compounds are classified as hazardous wastes in California.
  • If not sent for recycling, used oil filters are assumed to be hazardous waste unless they are proven to be non-hazardous by laboratory analysis.
  • Drain and collect the free-flowing oil from the filters.
  • The collected oil may be managed under the requirements for used oil.
  • Properly contain, label and store the used filters.
  • Store the filters within the allowed time limits.
  • Used oil filters need to be turned over to EH&S on a 90 day cycle.
  • Used oil filters must be drained of all free-flowing oil before they are placed in containers. The term “free-flowing” means a continuous stream of used oil from the filter when it is turned over. Used oil that flows drop-by-drop is not considered to be free-flowing.
  • If the filter is equipped with a flapper valve or other device that blocks the drainage, the valve must be opened or the filter case punctured or opened to allow the residual used oil or fuel to drain freely.
  • Since oil filters can still drip oil after they have been drained, oil filters must be placed in a container that can capture all of the used oil that continues to drain from the filters.
  • The containers of used filters must be: 1) Labeled as “Drained Used Oil Filters”, 2) Clearly marked with the initial date of accumulation or receipt. The initial date of accumulation is the date when the first filter is placed in the container, or the date when a container of filters is received at a second location, 3) Contained in rainproof, non-leaking, closed containers, 4) Closed and sealed containers during transportation so that used oil will not spill out if the containers are placed or fall on their sides.
  • Comply with the section above on the Management of Automotive Hazardous Wastes - Labeling & Accumulation.

Paints

  • All paints are considered to be hazardous wastes and are to be managed as indicated above.

Used Rags/Other Absorbents

  • Used shop rags and other absorbents typically contain oils, gasoline and or toxic heavy metals and are to be managed as a hazardous waste.
  • These wastes must be stored in closed metal containers because of the potential for spontaneous combustion.
  • Absorbents are separately drummed, labeled as "Hazardous Waste," and disposed by EH&S.

Wheel Weights

  • California Law prohibits the manufacture, sale and installation of lead wheel weights.
  • It is against California law to sell a new motor vehicle manufactured on or after Jan. 1, 2010 with lead wheel weights.  A wheel weight that complies with the new law will must be installed.
  • If selling a used vehicle that has lead wheel weights installed, you are not required to replace the weights with compliant weights unless the weights are removed or altered prior to sale.
  • If the tires are replaced prior to the sale of a new or used vehicle, the wheel weights will have to be in compliance with the new law. Additionally, if lead wheel weights are removed from a tire for any reason, the old lead wheel weight cannot be placed back on the tire. A wheel weight that complies with the new law will need to be installed on the car.
  • In order to manage lead wheel weights:
        • Place in a container labeled “lead wheel weights only - scrap metal” near the tire changing and wheel balancing machines. 
        • Keep the container securely covered and only uncover it when adding discarded wheel weights. 
        • Recycle discarded lead wheel weights as scrap metal.
        • Do not put lead wheel weights in the trash cans or dumpsters. 
        • Return all lead wheel weights unused product to your supplier for credit or recycle them. 
        • Train your service technicians, supervisors, and cleaning staff on the above requirements