Graphic Organizers

Long Range Planning

history wall timeline on classroom wall

How does time fit together so that it can be used to accomplish a task? This activity divides the scheduling and apportioning of time - which is one of the primary functions of any organization - into manageable steps. Certain things must be done; a certain amount of time is available. The time frame and the steps for classroom projects are listed; the step-by-step progress is studied and adapted to meet each goal. Students, then, work backwards in order to plan an event.

The flow chart is a visual tool that depicts the path to a goal. Often the planning time far exceeds the duration of the actual event such as getting ready for a dinner party, a wedding, space travel, a class trip or rehearsing a play. By moving backward from a future deadline, essential tasks are identified. The time necessary to complete these tasks is estimated, and the tasks are analyzed to see which ones can be done simultaneously. Calendars, agendas, lists and charts to compare the different forms for organizing time are resources.

What is to be accomplished for the year and the daily classroom schedule have traditionally been the property of the teacher. Placing a long-range planning chart in the classroom lets students see what lies ahead. By developing and modifying the chart, identifying landmark activities and regularly assessing progress the use of time becomes visible.

Based on Chapter 7 of Transformations: Process and Theory by Doreen Nelson.

1. Listing the steps required for completing the planned future city, village, town, civilization or any other task on a linear calendar.

1. Listing the steps required for completing the planned future city, village, town, civilization or any other task on a linear calendar.

2. Numbering and listing the items in order of priorities.

2. Numbering and listing the items in order of priorities.

3. Building a three dimensional timeline out of "junk" to symbolize the importance and the duration of activities.

3. Building a three dimensional timeline out of "junk" to symbolize the importance and the duration of activities.

4. Identifying the critical or pivotal points where more than one activity comes together and problems are more likely to occur.

4. Identifying the critical or pivotal points where more than one activity comes together and problems are more likely to occur.

5. Rewriting the list and putting the tasks in order on a calendar.

5. Rewriting the list and putting the tasks in order on a calendar.

6. Using the flow chart daily as a teaching tool.

6. Using the flow chart daily as a teaching tool.

7. An entire school making a collective curriculum which is displayed in the hallway entry.

7. An entire school making a collective curriculum which is displayed in the hallway entry.

 

History Wall

History is a process of ideas, choices, creations and events that are simultaneous and related rather than sequential and isolated. History is full of successes and failures, yet we tend to put only perfect papers on the classroom walls. Why?

The History Wall activities test and expand visual, spatial and temporal memories. Used to review information, the classroom walls become the "History Wall". It gives time a scale, shows relationships, improves report writing, the reading comprehension skills of finding main ideas and offers opportunities to develop reasoning. The materials displayed measure individual and group successes and serve as an aid to self examination. By studying the processes as well as the products of work, a sense is developed that history flows.

Classroom life presents an opportunity for making a timeline of events to record the "history" of the classroom. Traditionally, classroom walls have been the property of the teacher. A "good" teacher changes the bulletin boards often. By having students collaborate with them to organize the classroom walls and ceiling, classroom history and progress become tools for learning.

This activity has students studying how history unfurls over time by tracing a significant classroom event back to the completion, planning, and ideas that allowed for it to occur. Students identify how everyone has their own unique understanding of historical events and patterns. They collect and agree upon significant artifacts from class activities. They set criteria for selection of items for display on the "wall" and study graphic methods for displaying information. The History Wall is maintained and evaluated regularly.

Based on Chapter 7 of Transformations, Process and Theory by Doreen Nelson.

1. Reviewing information

1. Reviewing information

2. Selecting materials

2. Selecting materials

3. Collaborating and organizing the classroom walls and ceiling to document class history and progress

3. Collaborating and organizing the classroom walls and ceiling to document class history and progress.

3. Collaborating and organizing the classroom walls and ceiling to document class history and progress

4. Collaborating and organizing the classroom walls and ceiling to document class history and progress.

5. Creating a classroom brochure as a guide for the docent tours.

5. Creating a classroom brochure as a guide for the docent tours.